The Recovery Village offers inpatient depression treatment (residential rehab for depression) alongside inpatient substance abuse treatment. Inpatient depression treatment may involve antidepressant medication, various forms of therapy (including yoga and art), counseling and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). CBT is a treatment process that involves changing thought processes to change behavior. This therapy allows individuals to reverse false self-beliefs that can lead to negative moods and behaviors. CBT is also used with substance use disorder treatment, even if no co-occurring disorder is present.

Addiction is an all-consuming disease, using much of an individual’s time, energy and resources. There are many physical, mental and emotional signs of addiction. If you or a loved one are experiencing a combination of these signs, treatment may be a stepping stone for long-term recovery. Looking for signs and symptoms of drug abuse can be the first step toward identifying an addiction: Inside NHS detox centre - Victoria Derbyshire
Lastly, drug rehab is important because it affords participants the opportunity to construct new habits. One of the more common characteristics of addicts is poor self-discipline and care. Rehab provides these individuals with the chance not only to set goals but to accomplish them as well. Routinely achieving goals provides addicts with an improved sense of self-worth and resolve.
More than 7 percent of all American adults have an alcohol use disorder. These adults drink too much, too often, and in ways that harm their health, their happiness, and their relationships. An intervention, in which the family outlines alcohol’s consequences, can push these people to enter treatment programs. Once there, counseling sessions, relapse prevention coaching, and support group work can help to support recovery. Relapse rates for alcohol fall within the 40-60 percent range, so people often need to stick with aftercare for the rest of life.
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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