It’s commonly known that even after the completion of a treatment program, the temptation to drink again is a lifelong challenge. However, in addition to coping skills and medication, treatment also gives the patient a vast network of contacts – a therapist, a sponsor from a support group, etc. – who make it their priority to talk the addict out of a potential relapse. Being accountable to someone who understands the challenge of trying to remain sober after treatment helps counter the fear and frustration that can be a part of that challenge.
Theresa Soltesz graduated with her Bachelor’s Degree in Addiction Science and Addiction Counseling from Minnesota State University in 2010. Upon completion of her degree and clinical internship, Theresa began her career as an Addiction Counselor in 2010. Theresa is currently certified as a Certified Addiction Professional (CAP) by The Florida Certification Board, a Certified International Alcohol and Drug Counselor (ICADC) by The International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC) since 2013. Theresa is also a Certified Professional Life Coach and is currently awaiting an additional certification as a Certified Behavioral Health Case Manager (CBHCM) by The Florida Certification Board.Theresa has worked as a Primary Addiction Counselor in various treatment centers for addiction and co-occurring disorders in Florida, Minnesota, and Colorado in various settings, including detox, residential, PHP, IOP and OP. Eager to learn, She has also worked as an Addiction Counselor for various populations, such as adolescent and adult males and females, diverse ethnic populations, homeless individuals, individuals suffering from severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI), and the LGBTQ community. As a proud recovering addict herself, Theresa understands first-hand the struggles of addiction.
The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. As the nation's leading nonprofit provider of comprehensive inpatient and outpatient treatment for adults and youth, the Foundation has 17 locations nationwide and collaborates with an expansive network throughout health care. With a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center, the Foundation today also encompasses a graduate school of addiction studies, a publishing division, an addiction research center, recovery advocacy and thought leadership, professional and medical education programs, school-based prevention resources and a specialized program for children who grow up in families with addiction.
Drug rehab facilities help people to recover from substance use disorders. There are many different types of drug rehab facilities. Some specialize in helping patients with a specific drug addiction; others offer a broader range of drug addiction services. Some rehab facilities are even gender- or age-specific, as this often helps patients feel more comfortable in the rehab setting. Inpatient and outpatient rehab facilities are also available.
It is important to find an alcohol rehab program that fits well with your personal beliefs. If you have strong religious beliefs, you can look for a program that shares your spiritual views. If you believe in the mind-body connection, a holistic program might be best for you. If you love the outdoors and physical activity for example, you may choose a program that includes outdoor and adventure therapies as part of its offerings.
Alcohol addiction can happen to anyone. While not everyone who drinks will become an alcoholic, heavy drinking over a long period of time makes it more likely that a problem will develop. There are many other factors, including genetics and underlying mental disorders, that can contribute to alcoholism. Millions of Americans struggle with an alcohol use disorder of some kind — from binge drinking to addiction.
Changes in the brain chemistry also increases the risk of experiencing withdrawal symptoms when you stop drinking. As mentioned, alcohol impairs the way in which the brain functions and it can interfere with the way in which it communicates messages and chemical signals around the body. It slows down signal transmissions, which explains why you might experience sedation and sleepiness when intoxicated.
Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Research the history of the Treatment Center or facility.  What is their success rate?  Can you find any medical recommendations for them online from members of the established rehab or medical community?  How long has the Center been in operation?  Is their leadership on solid ground?  Are there any signs of financial corruption associated with the Center that is readily visible on the Internet?  It is your responsibility to dig for this information.  If you cannot find any information about a given Treatment Center online or at your local library, move on to the next Center on your list! 3 Stages of Drug Alcohol Rehab-How It Works
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