When it comes to recovering from drug addiction, there are many questions that may arise about the healing process, whether you’re the person struggling with addiction, or if you have a loved one who battles substance use. How do you know if you need help from a drug rehab center? What kind of drug rehab treatment is right for you? What can you expect from a drug addiction rehab center? This resource provides answers to some of your most important questions regarding rehab drug treatment, commonly abused drugs, the drug recovery process, and the various options for addiction help.
Inpatient or residential treatment  can also be very effective, especially for those with more severe problems (including co-occurring disorders). Licensed residential treatment facilities offer 24-hour structured and intensive care, including safe housing and medical attention. Residential treatment facilities may use a variety of therapeutic approaches, and they are generally aimed at helping the patient live a drug-free, crime-free lifestyle after treatment. Examples of residential treatment settings include:
Like any other life-threatening disease, drug addiction requires intensive treatment by credentialed specialists. While some may be able to find recovery alone, true healing is a lifelong process that typically requires continued support. Drug addiction treatment options range from medical detox and inpatient care to 12-step programming, pharmacotherapy and outpatient services. Throughout a continuum of care, patients are offered resources, skills and support to ensure that they’re making progress toward recovery goals.
In a survey of treatment providers from three separate institutions, the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors, Rational Recovery Systems and the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, measuring the treatment provider's responses on the "Spiritual Belief Scale" (a scale measuring belief in the four spiritual characteristics of AA identified by Ernest Kurtz); the scores were found to explain 41% of the variance in the treatment provider's responses on the "Addiction Belief Scale" (a scale measuring adherence to the disease model or the free-will model of addiction).[30] Addiction Help - Allie Severino Sentenced to 120 Years in Prison at Age 17! Beat Her Drug Addiction.

If faith-based rehabilitation and professional rehab clinics are not viable options for you, look into state funded free alcohol addiction treatment. These programs are entirely funded by tax dollars and vary from one state to another. Some offer long-term treatment including residential care, while others offer only short-term treatment consisting primarily of detoxification. You won't know what your state can offer you until you ask. It may just be your ticket to sobriety.


Determine the patient's readiness for change. Motivating a reluctant patient is one of the great challenges in treatment. To enhance the prospects of successful treatment, the clinician needs to have a basic concept of the stages of change. The 5 stages of change (Prochaska,) provide fundamental guidance for enhancing motivation. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment presents this concept in detail through a Treatment Improvement Protocol titled "Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment." The 5 stages of change are precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance. Specific strategies aligned with each of the 5 stages help a clinician motivate and prepare the patient for change. The 5 stages of change represent a cycle, permitting and explaining behavior that moves in both progressive and regressive directions.
Drug addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes powerful physical and psychological cravings for mind-altering substances, including illegal intoxicants like cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and PCP. Many people also become addicted to misused prescription drugs, or to chemical substances not manufactured for human consumption (inhalants), to party drugs (ecstasy), hallucinogens like LSD, or to marijuana, which despite its benign reputation is the most widely abused illicit drug.
Any drug overdose can be either accidental or intentional. Drug overdoses are the leading cause of death for Americans under 50. Accidental overdoses tend to happen when people take more of a prescription medication than originally intended to achieve certain results, or when they use too much of an illegal drug trying to get a better high. Intentional overdoses are usually a result of someone trying to commit suicide. Regardless of the intent, any loss of life due to an overdose is tragic and any overdose can have severe and lasting repercussions.
Treatments for addiction vary widely according to the types of drugs involved, amount of drugs used, duration of the drug addiction, medical complications and the social needs of the individual. Determining the best type of recovery program for an addicted person depends on a number of factors, including: personality, drugs of choice, concept of spirituality or religion, mental or physical illness, and local availability and affordability of programs.
Psychological dependency is addressed in many drug rehabilitation programs by attempting to teach the patient new methods of interacting in a drug-free environment. In particular, patients are generally encouraged, or possibly even required, to not associate with peers who still use the addictive substance. Twelve-step programs encourage addicts not only to stop using alcohol or other drugs, but to examine and change habits related to their addictions. Many programs emphasize that recovery is a permanent process without culmination. For legal drugs such as alcohol, complete abstention—rather than attempts at moderation, which may lead to relapse—is also emphasized ("One is too many, and a thousand is never enough.") Whether moderation is achievable by those with a history of abuse remains a controversial point, but is generally considered unsustainable.[2]
Integrated treatment is comprehensive programming that offers all of the therapeutic resources necessary to help the individual heal physically, mentally, and spiritually. There is no one cause of addiction, though living with a mental health disorder may increase the likelihood of developing a substance use disorder — and vice versa. Everyone is different. In some cases, a mental health disorder predates the development of a drug abuse. In other cases, mental health symptoms are not apparent until after addiction has taken hold — sometimes, these conditions are exacerbated or worsened by drug use.
Problem drinking soon progresses to physical dependency. At this stage, you have probably developed a tolerance to alcohol and require more of it to feel the same level of enjoyment as before. This increased consumption can cause your body to get used to alcohol. When you are not using it, or the effects begin to wear off, you will experience physical withdrawal symptoms such as a rapid heartbeat, sweating, tremors, and nausea. Alcohol Detox Treatment
3. The meat of the program (psychotherapy and behavioral treatments) – This is one of the most important phases of rehabilitation, as it begins to give you a base for future sobriety. During this phase, you work with an alcohol counselor to address your current mental and emotional condition and understand where it’s coming from.  Then, you can start to make behavioral and attitudinal changes to remain sober, prevent relapse, and start living a happy life. If you are dedicated – the chances for your alcohol rehab program to work are increases and you have made significant steps towards becoming sober long-term. Best Drug Rehabilitation Programs Backed By Research. Find Out Why.
Relapse prevention. Patients can use medications to help re-establish normal brain function and decrease cravings. Medications are available for treatment of opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers), tobacco (nicotine), and alcohol addiction. Scientists are developing other medications to treat stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) addiction. People who use more than one drug, which is very common, need treatment for all of the substances they use.
An intervention can be held in the immediate aftermath of a terrible alcoholism consequence. Those openings are easy to find. For example, research published in Addiction suggests that people who drink before heading out on the town are 2.5 times more likely to get in a fight while out, compared to people who don’t drink. When people come home from a night of drinking with bruises and cuts, an intervention may be in order, and it may be well received.
Physical dependence on a drug can cause serious withdrawal symptoms if a person suddenly stops using the substance or severely reduces the dose. The withdrawal process itself can be uncomfortable and dangerous. Some of the classic signs of withdrawal include tremors, cold sweats, involuntary movements (e.g., jerking, twitching, or shaking), nausea and vomiting, muscle cramps and bone pain. Because withdrawal can be dangerous, proper medical detox can be a life-saving step in recovery.
Focus on one area where you are experiencing the urge. Notice the exact sensations in that area. For example, do you feel hot, cold, tingly, or numb? Are your muscles tense or relaxed? How large an area is involved? Notice the sensations and describe them to yourself. Notice the changes that occur in the sensation. “My mouth feels dry and parched. There is tension in my lips and tongue. I keep swallowing. As I exhale, I can imagine the tingle of using.”

As important as evidence-based psychotherapy is for our addiction treatment program, it can’t be the only activity at Searidge Foundation. We schedule a wide variety of alternative therapies that help reinforce the more clinical drug rehab treatments and keep each day spent with us interesting and rewarding. This program includes Yoga, meditation, mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, Tai Chi, relaxation therapy, creative art therapy and Native healing rituals. These activities help renew the body, the mind, and the soul. And while these practices cannot cure you of a drug addiction, they can empower you with a healthy and entirely individual strength and spirit that will help you cope with life’s daily stresses and anxieties in a helpful constructive manner, rather than self medicating with drugs or alcohol.
Drug detox: Detox, short for detoxification, is the first phase in many substance abuse treatment programs. During detox, patients are monitored by professionals during their withdrawal from drugs. Medications, nutritional supplementation and fluid replacement may be provided to relieve withdrawal symptoms. At the same time, counseling is provided to encourage the patient to move forward to the next phase of rehabilitation.
People who are addicted to drugs need to be in a drug-free environment with people who will hold them accountable for their goal of getting off drugs. Drug rehab may begin with detoxification, which helps the addict rid his or her body of the drugs and treat any withdrawal symptoms. Not everyone needs to go through detox, but detox alone is not enough treatment to effectively break the addictive cycle long-term. Once detox is completed, the real work of addiction treatment begins.

Inpatient addiction treatment focuses on stabilization and assessment of your health to ensure you are ready--physically, psychologically and emotionally--to learn about core recovery concepts and to begin practicing recovery principles. Each day, you will be given a schedule of treatment activities, appointments and services tailored to meet your specific recovery needs and goals. Learn more about what happens in a typical day of inpatient addiction treatment.
While detox is often looked upon as one of the most difficult aspects of the recovery process, addicts aren’t in the clear once they make it through withdrawal.5The real work of recovery takes place post-detox in the therapeutic portion of treatment. In therapy, both individual and group, recovering addicts uncover the root causes behind their substance abuse, helping them to address these issues so they don’t cause them to return to substance abuse at a later date.3 Connor's Battle with Pills to Heroin | True Stories of Addiction | Detox To Rehab
Once used as a diagnostic label, substance abuse typically refers to behavioral patterns of drug use that involve impairment and physical and mental distress. Some people may use the term “drug abuse” to reference a marked physical and mental dependence on drugs. Today, drug abuse typically refers to misusing substances, not necessarily being addicted to them. However, drug abuse can often lead to a physical dependence or addiction associated with a focus on obtaining and using drugs and severe withdrawal symptoms.
More problematically, they are also not removed from their home environment which has proven to facilitate the drug-taking behaviour which has led to addiction, and are still able to contact their dealer/s if the temptation to relapse proves overpowering. Their whole recovery rests upon their strength of will – which in some cases may not prove sufficient at critical times. Top 10 Luxury Drug Rehab Centers In USA
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