After the physical detoxification process, the next stage of alcohol treatment involves treating the mental health of the patient with counseling and therapy. A psychologist or psychotherapist will work closely with the patient to help identify the reasons that the patient turned to problem drinking. Once these reasons are understood, the next stage is to apply the understanding to the future, giving the patient the tools they need to make better choices and decisions. Part of the treatment process is to break associations with the people and environments that encouraged the patient to drink past healthy levels. Since alcohol is so prevalent in society and even everyday life, treatment will also involve learning how to resist the temptation to drink in socially acceptable situations, and how to deal with the thoughts and memories of the pleasure derived from drinking.
What happens in the brain during alcohol withdrawal? GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is the main calming neurotransmitter of the brain. GABA and adrenaline are supposed to be in balance during normal brain functioning. Frequent drinking causes the brain to produce less GABA, because the brain begins to rely on alcohol for part of its calming. So, frequent drinking causes your brain chemistry to be out of balance with an excess of adrenaline. When you suddenly stop drinking, your brain doesn’t have enough GABA neurotransmitter to balance the excess of adrenaline, which causes withdrawal symptoms.
If you live in a very rural area and or do not have the ability to attend traditional support groups, online support groups may prove to be incredibly beneficial for you. Nearly all of the support groups that offer in-person meetings also offer online meetings. These meetings are almost always completely free of charge and offer fellowship, support, encouragement, and advice from recovering alcoholics who used to be in the same exact position you are in now. If anyone can give you helpful advice, it's them.
  Great experience. Everything I needed. A safe place, calm and tranquil. Very spacious and and comfortable, lots of areas to relax, read or meditate. The groups of men and women with years of sobriety, AA and NA meetings helped me to open my eyes, find myself and spirituality... I'm back! Ready to truly live and enjoy life. Thank you to everyone at the center and groups. Thank to my sponsor. I'm so grateful.
The National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago reported an analysis on disparities within admissions for substance abuse treatment in the Appalachian region, which comprises 13 states and 410 counties in the Eastern part of the U.S. While their findings for most demographic categories were similar to the national findings by NSDUH, they had different results for racial/ethnic groups which varied by sub-regions. Overall, Whites were the demographic with the largest admission rate (83%), while Alaskan Native, American Indian, Pacific Islander, and Asian populations had the lowest admissions (1.8%).[45]
These individuals may not know that there are options for them. Free rehab centers and public assistance for rehab do exist. Exploring treatment avenues such as these is a good idea as it may reveal detox programs and other recovery options available to you at little or no cost. There are also opportunities to defray the cost of treatment or to have it covered by another entity. Many of these options are outlined below.
In-House Treatment Centers provide drug and alcohol rehab for individuals and their families that are suffering from moderate to severe addiction to alcohol, substance abuse, and co-occurring disorders.  As differentiated from Hospital Drug and Alcohol Rehab Programs, In-House Treatment Centers are often located in resort-style, private facilities designed to treat the whole person with a more personalized and compassionate approach to recovery. Psychology of Drug Addiction & Substance Abuse Disorder, Causes & Solutions
Individual therapy will help you learn to recognize triggers and cope with them. The therapists may also help you to improve your emotional regulation skills in order to better avoid relapse. Group counseling provides you with the opportunity to practice sober social skills, as well as the coping strategies you learned in individual counseling. Family therapy sessions can help to repair broken relationships, improve communication skills, and build conflict resolution skills. Medication, such as methadone or Suboxone, may be used in combination with behavioral therapy to help opioid-addicted individuals remain abstinent. Once your rehab program nears an end, your treatment team will create an aftercare or relapse prevention plan for you consisting of ongoing support. Ongoing support may include individual therapy, group counseling, self-help group meetings (e.g., 12-step, SMART Recovery), alumni programs, or sober living homes.1,2
Mental health disorder. If you have a mental health disorder such as depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or post-traumatic stress disorder, you're more likely to become addicted to drugs. Using drugs can become a way of coping with painful feelings, such as anxiety, depression and loneliness, and can make these problems even worse.
Alcohol-related hospital admissions in the UK rose by 100,000 people last year – and deaths have rocketed by 16% in the last decade, new NHS figures show. Eytan Alexander, CEO of UKAT, says his treatment centres had also experienced a rise in alcohol-related cases – throughout 2018, UKAT treated 1,025 patients for alcohol addiction in 2018, compared to just 579 in 2015: a 77% rise in three years.( Eytan Alexander 5 Feb 2098 )
The most important thing to consider after alcohol rehabilitation is having an aftercare program that allows you continued treatment and a safe environment to maintain sobriety. It is also important that you follow suggestions to help you continue to maintain constant sobriety. Suggestions can include attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous, SMART recovery or another community or church groups, addiction counseling, or living in a halfway house. Finding a safe environment to live in while entering back in to the normal realm of every day life is imperative.

For some people, secondary care is an essential phase between intensive treatment and rehab and a full return to normal life; this is especially likely to be the case if an addict’s home environment is dysfunctional or challenging in other ways, and the addict does not yet feel robust enough in their recovery to deal with those challenges as well as the ongoing challenge of staying drug-free.
In 2016, Recovery Brands conducted a survey asking patients leaving a recovery treatment program what clinic characteristics they saw as high priority aspects to examine when looking at a program. The top priority was the clinic's financial practices, such as insurance accepted, payment options, and financial support. They also valued facility offerings (amenities, comforts, quality of housing, etc.) much more after graduating from treatment. Individuals looking for treatment will want to look at a facility's financial policies as well as the program's offerings to aid in their final program choice. Read More
Outpatient treatment is the next step down in a continuum of care. It is also a rehabilitation option for individuals whose addiction is less severe and doesn’t require inpatient treatment. Clients in this phase of rehab drug treatment visit the facility regularly, but do not stay overnight. This approach allows the individual to receive drug treatment while maintaining family and job responsibilities. Drug Addict Is Terrified When He Sees the Rehab Car | The Jeremy Kyle Show
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