Even if you are aware of the harm that prolonged heavy drinking causes to the body, you will tend to believe that you would never let it get to that stage because you would be sure to stop long before then. But the truth is that drinking causes great harm to the body long before you can see the effects, and the most serious consequences might not be that far off. An idea of the extent of the negative health impacts of drinking can be seen in the NHS finances, which show that alcohol consumption is responsible for over 10% of the cost of healthcare in Britain.

It is not just the addict who suffers from addiction: those around them, especially family members, can be profoundly affected too. Some good rehabs have a strong focus on the family, in terms both of the role the family can play in an addict’s recovery, and of the recovery of the family members themselves who may have experienced great distress and even trauma as a result of their loved one’s addiction.


In the United States, there are many government-issued services and resources that can help with alcoholism. One of the most common, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), serves as an information hub and treatment referral service. Additionally, more states are focusing on affordable treatment options to make sure anyone who is in need of treatment receives help. Unfortunately, with an increasing demand for alcoholism treatment services, many government-funded programs have wait lists and other requirements such as financial and medical need.


Each state has category defined statutes; for example, there are low-income seniors, parents enrolled in Medicaid of low-income children, pregnant woman, and low-income children of a particular age. Persons with disabilities fall into certain categories as well, if they receive supplemental security income and have no work history they are enrolled in Medicaid to ensure they have health coverage. A person must prove they have a disability, such as blindness, deafness, mental illness, or a physical disability that prevents them from working.
Antabuse is a bridge between your two lives. On the one hand, you have the life that you know. It's not what's good for you, but it's what you know. On the other hand, you have the life that you want to get to. It's better for you, but you don't know how to live there. You don't know how to relax, reward yourself, and celebrate without using drugs or alcohol. Antabuse helps you live in that life long enough so that you can develop new habits and coping skills.

Like any other life-threatening disease, drug addiction requires intensive treatment by credentialed specialists. While some may be able to find recovery alone, true healing is a lifelong process that typically requires continued support. Drug addiction treatment options range from medical detox and inpatient care to 12-step programming, pharmacotherapy and outpatient services. Throughout a continuum of care, patients are offered resources, skills and support to ensure that they’re making progress toward recovery goals.
Drug detox: Detox, short for detoxification, is the first phase in many substance abuse treatment programs. During detox, patients are monitored by professionals during their withdrawal from drugs. Medications, nutritional supplementation and fluid replacement may be provided to relieve withdrawal symptoms. At the same time, counseling is provided to encourage the patient to move forward to the next phase of rehabilitation.
Don’t wait until those consequences occur; if you suspect there is a drug problem present in your loved one, talk to them and/or seek professional help if you deem that it is needed. Never let the addict downplay the seriousness of their addiction or convince you that they can change without help. Drug addiction is a disease and recovering from it is rarely as simple as just putting down the drug and being done with it for good, no matter what promises the addict in your life may make to you or how earnestly they may make those promises.

A large body of scientific evidence has been gathered in recent years to show that addiction can run in families. In fact, children of alcohol-addicted parents are four times more likely to develop alcohol addiction in later life than those born to parents without alcohol addictions. How this works is complex, and there is no one ‘alcohol gene’ to blame for this; instead a number of genetic variations, which mean some individuals are more pre-disposed to alcoholism than others.


Because an alcohol use disorder can be a chronic relapsing disease, persistence is key. It is rare that someone would go to treatment once and then never drink again. More often, people must repeatedly try to quit or cut back, experience recurrences, learn from them, and then keep trying. For many, continued followup with a treatment provider is critical to overcoming problem drinking.
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) once referred to substance abuse and substance dependence as diagnostic terms. However, in the updated fifth edition (DSM-5), these terms are replaced by the singular substance use disorder, which is broken into mild, moderate and severe to refer to the physical and mental impairments through recurrent substance use. AToN Center Drug & Alcohol Addiction Treatment Center Tour & Interviews
Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite adverse consequences.† It is considered a brain disorder, because it involves functional changes to brain circuits involved in reward, stress, and self-control, and those changes may last a long time after a person has stopped taking drugs.11

Addiction is an all-consuming disease, using much of an individual’s time, energy and resources. There are many physical, mental and emotional signs of addiction. If you or a loved one are experiencing a combination of these signs, treatment may be a stepping stone for long-term recovery. Looking for signs and symptoms of drug abuse can be the first step toward identifying an addiction: Inside NHS detox centre - Victoria Derbyshire
×