Physical dependence on a drug can cause serious withdrawal symptoms if a person suddenly stops using the substance or severely reduces the dose. The withdrawal process itself can be uncomfortable and dangerous. Some of the classic signs of withdrawal include tremors, cold sweats, involuntary movements (e.g., jerking, twitching, or shaking), nausea and vomiting, muscle cramps and bone pain. Because withdrawal can be dangerous, proper medical detox can be a life-saving step in recovery. Sunrise Foundation Rehabilitation Center in India near Mumbai


Alcoholism treatment typically consists of a detox, followed by rehabilitation. Rehab programmes take place in either an inpatient or outpatient clinic, depending on your needs and circumstances. How severe your illness is, the length of time you have been addicted, and your personal situation will all play a role in what type of programme you choose.
Detox centers are intended to treat drug and alcohol addiction. One of the many benefits of detoxing at a rehab facility is that it’s safer than at-home detox. The reason is that it’s supervised by medical professionals who can monitor any withdrawal symptoms, some of which can be very painful. They typically include specialized programs, such as those at The Recovery Village, in addition to medications and other treatment methods to aid in recovery. Inpatient detox centers provide the highest level of supervision and medical monitoring of any type of detox center.
Drug rehabilitation is the process of medical or psychotherapeutic treatment for dependency on psychoactive substances such as alcohol, prescription drugs, and street drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin or amphetamines. The general intent is to enable the patient to confront substance dependence, if present, and cease substance abuse to avoid the psychological, legal, financial, social, and physical consequences that can be caused, especially by extreme abuse. Treatment includes medication for depression or other disorders, counseling by experts and sharing of experience with other addicts.[1]
Within the framework of the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is redefined as a drug addiction, and can be diagnosed without the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome.[6] It was described accordingly: "When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders."[7] In the DSM-5 (released in 2013), substance abuse and substance dependence have been merged into the category of substance use disorders and they no longer exist as individual diagnosis.[8] Russel Brand on Addiction and the 12 Step Program
The first step in recovery is deciding if you have a problem. This can be difficult, because your addicted-self will try hard to convince you that you don't have a problem. This is where a trained professional can gently help. They can keep you from tricking yourself and prevent you from slipping back into denial. They are trained to look for signs of trouble.
Hallucinogenic drugs. Hallucinogens are psychoactive drugs that affect the way you experience the world around you. A few of the most popular hallucinogenic drugs include Ecstasy, LSD PCP, and mushrooms. The effects of hallucinogenic drugs can range from pleasant sensory distortions and feelings of empathy to terrifying hallucinations and violent impulses. These psychedelic substances are popular among young people, many of whom are introduced to hallucinogenic drugs at clubs, raves, concerts, or parties. Although hallucinogenic drugs are commonly believed to be non-addictive, clinical research has shown that drugs like Ecstasy can cause signs of physical and psychological dependence, including withdrawal symptoms, obsessive thoughts, and cravings.

“Residential rehab” and “inpatient rehab” are two phrases often used interchangeably, as they both follow medical detox, and accommodate the physical and psychological needs of individuals in recovery. They also both involve full-time treatment at a rehab facility, allowing for 24-hour monitoring. However, one major difference between the two forms of treatment is the length of the program.
Overcoming an alcohol addiction starts with a qualified treatment center that can help address underlying and co-occurring disorders. Because of alcohol’s prevalence throughout our culture, recovering alcoholics are constantly bombarded with triggers. Treatment centers must be equipped to help the recovering user find effective ways to manage triggers and cravings in order to be effective. The Biblical Principles in the 12 Steps of Recovery - Kenyon Burns
Treatment is sometimes intensive at first, where patients attend multiple outpatient sessions each week. After completing intensive treatment, patients transition to regular outpatient treatment, which meets less often and for fewer hours per week to help sustain their recovery. In September 2017, the FDA permitted marketing of the first mobile application, reSET®, to help treat substance use disorders. This application is intended to be used with outpatient treatment to treat alcohol, cocaine, marijuana, and stimulant substance use disorders. In December 2018, the FDA cleared a mobile medical application, reSET®, to help treat opioid use disorders. This application is a prescription cognitive behavioral therapy and should be used in conjunction with treatment that includes buprenorphine and contingency management. Read more about reSET® in this FDA News Release.
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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