Biological factors that can affect a person's risk of addiction include their genes, stage of development, and even gender or ethnicity. Scientists estimate that genes, including the effects environmental factors have on a person's gene expression, called epigenetics, account for between 40 and 60 percent of a person's risk of addiction.27 Also, teens and people with mental disorders are at greater risk of drug use and addiction than others.28

An additional cognitively-based model of substance abuse recovery has been offered by Aaron Beck, the father of cognitive therapy and championed in his 1993 book Cognitive Therapy of Substance Abuse.[42] This therapy rests upon the assumption addicted individuals possess core beliefs, often not accessible to immediate consciousness (unless the patient is also depressed). These core beliefs, such as "I am undesirable," activate a system of addictive beliefs that result in imagined anticipatory benefits of substance use and, consequentially, craving. Once craving has been activated, permissive beliefs ("I can handle getting high just this one more time") are facilitated. Once a permissive set of beliefs have been activated, then the individual will activate drug-seeking and drug-ingesting behaviors. The cognitive therapist's job is to uncover this underlying system of beliefs, analyze it with the patient, and thereby demonstrate its dysfunctional. As with any cognitive-behavioral therapy, homework assignments and behavioral exercises serve to solidify what is learned and discussed during treatment.[43]

Drug addiction is defined by the existence of both psychological dependence and physical dependence on at least one illicit substance, according to PubMed Health. Marijuana, cocaine, crystal meth, heroin, synthetic drugs and even prescription drugs that can be effective medically are highly addictive. There are a number of reasons why someone may develop an addiction, but recovery comes the same way to everyone: through comprehensive treatment that addresses individual obstacles to sobriety.


Most patients will want to exit treatment as soon as possible, however, that is not always the best course of action. Treatment programs can vary greatly in terms of length, and the length of stay should be determined on a case-by-case basis as per the readiness of the patient to manage sobriety in addition to the responsibilities of life at home and/or at work. We offer 30-day, 60-day, and 90-day program options and can help you determine which will be most appropriate for your addicted loved one based on his or her needs in treatment.
According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), intervention meetings are different to more traditional alcoholism treatment programs. While this type of meeting is usually designed for a person who is on the cusp of developing an alcohol problem, they can also help motivate an alcoholic in to seeking more extensive treatment for their alcoholism. The best intervention meetings are usually those that both the alcoholic person and family can attend together. This allows the family to discuss how the individual's alcoholism has affected them as a unit. This is also a good setting for loved ones to strongly demand that the individual seek treatment, as they have the backup of professional counselors.
There are several differences between inpatient and outpatient care. Inpatient care is a more intense level of care than outpatient care, which is often a step down from inpatient care. Unlike inpatient care, outpatient treatment does not require clients to stay overnight. Clients can come to the facility regularly (daily, weekly, etc.) for a set number of hours a week, and go home after their session. This allows them to maintain their work schedule and tend to any other off-site responsibilities. Care is less intensive than the inpatient level, as clients typically no longer require round-the-clock care.

Many chronic conditions such as arthritis or diabetes carry a risk of recurrence, even after years of successful medical management. In a similar way, there will always be a possibility of relapse for those in recovery.1 However, finding a reputable treatment program that utilizes evidence-based treatment (and staying in treatment long enough—NIDA recommends at least 3 months) gives people a head start on sobriety and gives them the tools they'll need to prevent relapse.2 Drug Rehab Near Me
  I will start out by writing that the Costa Rica Treatment Center has saved my life...I was at rock bottom. Robert and Eric came and picked me up in Jaco, in very bad shape, and they persistently, lovingly, gently, firmly, medicinally, therapeutically, turned me back around, cared for me taught me, changed me...I lived here for one month, and just felt safe and secure. They slowly brought me back to good health. I have grown spiritually, mentally, physically, and emotionally, and can never repay what has been given to me. From Gernot and Maggie (owners of this beautiful home), Robert (administrator, jefe) full of life and play but very disciplined, Eric (assistant manager, wonderful strong, positive, caring energy), Arturo ( Yoga instructor, who gave me daily 5 am classes, with meditation, and a chef), Donia Sonya ( housekeeping), Sheila(psychotherapist), Diego and Marianna(psychologists), Diego (MD), and other persons, in Recovery, who will remain anonymous, who have given their time and advice, and lent an ear to me...I feel this is the best place for you, if you are struggling with an addiction that is out of your control. They just "know" here, how it feels, they understand, without judgement, and their goal is to help you manage your addiction, and move forward into a good life full of purpose, kindness and happiness...This home is beautiful, spacious, room for togetherness and privacy, serene, alcoves, patios, gardens, my room was so cozy, I was able to get much needed rest. I will continue to keep Costa Rica Treatment Center a part of my life, with much gratitude to all of you for returning me to the old, and new Allison...very, very thankful... Russell Brand From Addiction To Recovery
Outpatient treatment is the next step down in a continuum of care. It is also a rehabilitation option for individuals whose addiction is less severe and doesn’t require inpatient treatment. Clients in this phase of rehab drug treatment visit the facility regularly, but do not stay overnight. This approach allows the individual to receive drug treatment while maintaining family and job responsibilities. Drug Addict Is Terrified When He Sees the Rehab Car | The Jeremy Kyle Show
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